2015

Mashable News: How an algorithm could help spread HIV information among homeless teens

February 6, 2015

"Algorithm" has become a dirty word. While many websites and social networks set up algorithms to anticipate and meet their users' needs, they also use them to manipulate our data for advertising, making money off every digital step we take.

But we can use algorithms for social good, too. Social workers and computer scientists at the University of Southern California (USC) are doing just that, using math and data to help prevent the spread of HIV among homeless teens.

Motherboard News: Artificial Intelligence Could Help Reduce HIV Among Homeless Youths

February 4, 2015

​Thousands of teenagers sleep on the streets every night in Canada, and spreading awareness about how they can avoid contracting viruses like HIV is no easy task. Artificial intelligence could help by singling out teens most likely to influence their peers.

PSINET, the algorithm in question, uses information about the friend networks of homeless youth, collected by staff at shelters, to map their social connections and predict which kids are the most likely to influence their friends.

USC News: To prevent the spread of HIV among the homeless, researchers turn to math

February 2, 2015

USC researchers have teamed up with Los Angeles social workers to address a public- health problem — the spread of HIV — using an unlikely method: mathematics.

Social workers at My Friend’s Place [http://myfriendsplace.org] , a nonprofit agency that helps Los Angeles’ homeless youth become more self-sufficient, have been working to prevent the spread of HIV among homeless teens and young adults.

They’ve relied in part on word-of-mouth, but have had limited success. Transient young adults often have fluid friendships; if two friends stop hanging out, a social worker’...

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Find it West Valley: USA News - Software can now beat any human player at poker

January 9, 2015

Poker aficionados have been pondering the greatest approaches ever considering that the card game was invented. Now along comes the great exponent, one particular who knows all the optimal plays and so generally wins in the long run – or so its makers claim.

The unbeatable player is a piece of software program designed by laptop or computer scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. They say they have worked out the excellent technique for a particular form of the game. The operate could have applications to real­planet conditions in which persons try to...

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Popular Science: The computer that taught itself to bluff

January 9, 2015

Practice makes perfect, even if you  happen to be a piece of artificial intelligence.

That was the premise of an experiment led by Michael Bowling of the University of Alberta, which set up a program called Cepheus to play a billion billion (yes, a billion billion) hands of a poker variant called heads-up limit Texas Hold’Em against itself. Cepheus ran on 4,600 CPUs, considering 6 billion hands per second, learning from each victory, split pot, and defeat. After the equivalent of 1,000 years of CPU time during 70 actual days, Cepheus had played more poker than that played...

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NewScientist: NewScientist - Software can now beat any human player at poker

January 9, 2015

Poker aficionados have been pondering the best strategies ever since the card game was invented. Now along comes the perfect exponent, one who knows all the optimal plays and so always wins in the long run – or so its makers claim.

The unbeatable player is a piece of software created by computer scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. They say they have worked out the ideal strategy for a particular form of the game. The work could have applications to real­ world situations in which people try to achieve preferred outcomes – including auctions and...

Read more about NewScientist: NewScientist - Software can now beat any human player at poker